USDA-NIFA Fort Hall Agricultural Extension Program Grant uri icon

Overview

abstract

  • NON-TECHNICAL SUMMARY: Project SummaryTitle: USDA-NIFA Fort Hall Agricultural Extension ProgramPD: Gunn, Danielle Institution: University of IdahoPriority Areas: Indian Farmer and Rancher Productivity and Management; Tribal Youth and4-H; Indian Community Development: Food Systems, Natural Resource Conservation, Human Nutrition.Overall Project Goals: Will provide leadership and cultivation of partnerships to develop, implement, and manage educational programs that systematically respond to producer, youth, and community needs in agriculture, natural resources, food systems, nutrition, and4-H/youth development.Objectives: The Tribes, Producers, Community and/or Youth will:Participate in annual youth development/4-H leadership, agriculture, food systems, and nutrition classes.Incorporate two or more of five technologies to improve agricultural operations.Adopt two of five strategies to protect and enhance natural resources through reduced range fire severity and noxious weed invasions.Adopt rangeland grazing plans to reduce cattle deaths due to disease.Adopt three of five food preservation and nutrition skills.Intended Outcomes: The Tribes, producers, community and/or youth will improve their lives and/or operations through knowledge and technology adoption, and reduced fire, noxious weeds, and livestock deaths. They will learn and apply knowledge of leadership, agriculture, food preservation, and nutrition.Plans to Accomplish Project Goals: Will utilize the FRTEP Extension Planning model and include agricultural technology demonstrations, beef, natural resources, gardening, farm business, food systems and nutrition classes, and youth leadership activitiesRelevance of Project to Program Goals: The project meets three program priorities, provides exceptional public value, and meets community needs and requests. It is results-based to encourage community growth, vitality, and agricultural enterprise viability. The project increases community cohesiveness and sustainability through educational programming, leadership, and partnership development.

    OBJECTIVES: The intrinsic goal of the Fort Hall Agricultural Extension program is to provide education, leadership, and cultivation of strong partnerships to further develop, implement, and manage educational programs that systematically respond to producer, youth, and community needs in agriculture, natural resources, food systems, nutrition, and 4-H/youth development. Additional major goals are to: 1) enhance economic and educational opportunities for agricultural producers, 2) enhance natural resource management, 3) encourage adoption of technology and new agricultural and natural resource practices, and 4) provide youth with leadership and educational programs, opportunities, and project development in agriculture, natural resources, science and technology.The supporting objectives are that the Tribes, producers, community and/or youth will: 1) incorporate two or more of five technologies to improve agricultural operations and reduce livestock disease, 2) adopt two or more of five strategies to protect and enhance natural resources through reduced range fire severity and frequency, and noxious weed invasions, 3) adopt grazing plans on rangeland to reduce cattle deaths due to animal disease, 4) address and manage elevated selenium levels found in identified range plants scientifically proven to accumulate toxic levels of selenium, 5) participate in annual youth development/4-H leadership, agriculture, food systems, safety, and nutrition classes, and 6) learn and adopt three or more of five food preservation and nutrition skills.

    APPROACH: The methods in which this project will be conducted include providing sound, science and research-based information to target audiences through demonstrations, workshops, classes, seminars, field tours, and home, ranch and farm visits, and popular press. Where appropriate, bulletins will be authored and developed for distribution to target audiences and other audiences as deemed appropriate. Public meetings and forums will be initiated if and when pertinentproblems and issues arise. Audiences will be notified of these events throughtargetaudience mailing lists, general mailing lists, email, social media, and popular press.In addition,educational events will beadvertised through brochures, post cards, and otherpublishedvenues postedat key community locations; i.e., theTribal Business Center,Trading Post, and others.The above listed methods and efforts will be designed with hands-on learning opportunities and evaluation methods that reinforce concepts presented to target audiences. Educational efforts, particularly those in which audiences can practice concepts taught or see the value of presented principles will, at minimum, result in an increase in knowledge, understanding and for optimum results, adoption into daily lives and/oragricultural operations.The manner in which this program will be evaluated to measure progress toward completing the four-year objectives will carefully examine each activity offered through the following steps. First, the PD will determine program impact for stakeholders through evaluation tools. Second, the PD will determine what adjustments must be made to increase individual and community impact. Third, the PD will follow up with selected program participants to ensure the information provided is useful and adaptable to their operations and/or situation. The PD will measure how participants and stakeholders incorporate and use new knowledge, ideas, and technology in their daily lives through interviews and surveys. These assessments will give the PD the opportunity to determine what is and what is not working. Finally, the PD will meet with stakeholders and advisory committees for further program assessment. A thorough process as identified above will guide any necessary adjustments or changes to the program and its' goals and objectives. The PD is involved in the community and is notified by the Tribe of issues that require immediate Extension assistance. These issues could include severe drought, flooding, fire, livestock disease incidence, and other potential problems. The PD views these events as a means to expand Extension programming and provide more public value to the community. Further, each activity can be entered into the FRETP Extension Planning Model located at https://cyfar.org/resource/cyfar-101-logic-model-and-common-measures. The use of this model can be used to evaluate the program and develop annual reports. More importantly, this model provides a means to measure inputs, outputs, and outcomes against each priority area. The annual assessment will address the 13 key steps identified in this model. Those steps are: 1) Identify needs and assets, 2) Identify desired program results, 3) Identify specific indicators, 4) Develop activities, 5) Identify and collect resources, 6) Identify data sources; 7) Identify when data will be collected, 8) Identify how data is collected, 9) Analyze data, 10) Identify sources of indicator data, 11) Identify time data was collected for indicator data, 12) Identify methods used to collect data, and 13) Complete a full data analysis. Common measures will be utilized and analyzed including, but not limited to demographics, participation level, program quality, knowledge learned, behavior changes, and knowledge and skills implemented by participants.A listing of evaluation activities that will take place include evaluations regarding change of knowledge, behaviors, and/or implementation of principles in daily lives for range fire practices, noxious weed control programs, farm business management course evaluations, beef practices, youth leadership development, and adoption of healthy life styles in targeted youth.Specific examples are provided below.Priority AreaObjectivesActions and OutcomesNumber of ParticipantsVerificationExamples of SuccessesIndian Farmer and Rancher Productivity and ManagementTeach and demonstrate: technology, animal health, and management practicesIncrease in knowledgeChange in behaviorImplement-ation of practices taughtRecorded at activity; anticipated number is 35 per event.Written evaluation, pre and posttests, surveys, focus groups, and interviewsAdoption of technology and how it benefited the operation, decreased number of livestock deaths, increased herd quality and increased financial stability.Tribal Youth and 4-HTeach 125 4-H and youth development classes, leadership skills, agriculture, livestock production, food systems, and nutritionIncrease in knowledgeChange in behaviorImplement-ationRecorded at activity; anticipated number is a minimum of 15 per class.Written evaluation, pre and posttests, surveys, focus groups, and interviewsAdoption of leadership skills, knowledge of agriculture and livestock production, knowledge of healthy foods and food systems, and implementation of healthy nutritional behaviors at home.Community Development: Food Systems, Natural Resource Conservation, Human NutritionTeach, develop, demonstrate and implement grazing plans, strategies to reduce range fires, and noxious weed infestations.Teach, demonstrate and implement food systems knowledge, food preservation techniques, and nutrition skills.Increase in knowledgeChange in behaviorImplement-ationIncrease in knowledgeChange in behaviorImplement-ationRecorded at activity; anticipated number is 35 based on past program successWritten evaluation, pre and posttests, surveys, focus groups, and interviewsMeasure-ments of project implementat-ion success, i.e., "were range fires, weeds and livestock deaths reduced?" If so, numbers and/or percentages will be provided.Knowledge of subject matter, change in behavior, and implementation of practices taught, and measurable results provided following each activity.Total number of acreages treated and rehabilitated will also be used to measure program success.

date/time interval

  • August 15, 2017 - August 14, 2019

total award amount

  • 87,000

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